Are entrepreneurs crazy?

Entrepreneurs are crazy and that's good For most people, the idea of creating their own business is crazy. There is no stable income, there is no plan to build it, and there is a significant risk that everything will collapse. But for those of us who have been bitten by the enterprising bug, it's all worth it. It is said that there is a fine line between genius and madness.

But do successful entrepreneurs really turn mental illness into innovation? Although motivated and innovative, hypomaniacs have a much higher risk of depression than the general population, says Gartner. Failure can lead to these depressive episodes, of course, but so can anything that slows the urge of a hypomaniac. They're like border collisions: they have to flee, says Gartner. If you keep them inside, they eat up the furniture.

They go crazy, they just walk around. They have to be busy, active, overworked. Secondly, there is the willingness of the visionary to take risks. Throwing something that no one else fully understands may seem crazy to some.

But for those of us who live it every day, the risks seem small. For me, a true entrepreneur is what society considers a crazy person. When you tell someone something that doesn't exist, they have every right in the world to think you're crazy. But it's when you give it life and others finally see it when you cross the fine line between crazy and cool.

Lately, more entrepreneurs have started talking about their internal struggles in an attempt to combat the stigma of depression and anxiety that makes it difficult for patients to seek help. Entrepreneurs often juggle many roles and face countless setbacks (loss of customers, disputes with partners, increased competition, personnel problems), all while struggling to pay payroll. But there are many entrepreneurs, especially in the Internet arena, who have built big businesses as introverts. Entrepreneurs don't like to abide by the rules, but it is this courage, creativity and energy that allow them to successfully challenge conventions.

If you thought there was some kind of correlation between entrepreneurs and mental illness and what do you think about it. Although launching a company will always be a wild ride, full of ups and downs, there are things entrepreneurs can do to prevent their lives from getting out of hand, experts say. But honestly, some of the biggest businessmen I've ever encountered are from world domination, disruption, bigger than the kind of life, are compensating for something really bad in their lives. It is not uncommon to find an entrepreneur with a great vision who clings to excess debt or who pays payroll with a credit card.

I'm sure there will be much more discussion about it, because there are all kinds of stereotypes around entrepreneurship and there is a cult of exceptionalism. It also reignited a debate on entrepreneurship and mental health that began two years earlier after the suicide of Ilya Zhitomirskiy, co-founder of Diaspora, a 22-year-old social networking site. When it comes to assessing risk, businessmen's blind spots are often big enough to drive a Mack truck, he says. It's interesting, because a lot of people think of entrepreneurs as these outgoing and grandiloquent personalities.

Complicating matters, new entrepreneurs often become less resilient by neglecting their health. That said, I think there is definitely if you want to call them qualities or afflictions that help and also harm entrepreneurs. According to researchers, many entrepreneurs share innate character traits that make them more vulnerable to mood swings.

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